UX News

A look at what's going on in the field of user experience.

Design with Difficult Data

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

A content placeholder card, with spaces for full name, job title, and location

You’ve been asked to design a profile screen for a mobile or web app. It will need to include an avatar, a name, a job title, and a location. You fire up Sketch or Figma. Maybe you pull out your drafting pencil or head straight to markup and CSS.

What’s your go-to fake name? Regardless of your choice in tools, you’re probably going to end up with some placeholder data. Are you the type that uses your own name, or do you conjure up your old friend, Mr. Lorem Ipsum? Maybe you have a go-to fake name, like Sophia J. Placeholder.

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Conversational Semantics

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

As Alexa, Cortana, Siri, and even customer support chat bots become the norm, we have to start carefully considering not only how our content looks but how it could sound. We can—and should—use HTML and ARIA to make our content structured, sensible, and most importantly, meaningful.

Content, confined Most bots and digital assistants work from specially-coded data sets, APIs, and models, but there are more than 4.5 billion pages of content on the web, trapped, in many cases, within our websites. Articles, stories, blog posts, educational materials, books, and marketing messages—all on the web, but in many cases unusable in a non-visual context. A few projects—search spiders most notably—are working to turn our messy, unstructured web pages into something usable. But we can do more—a lot more—to facilitate that and enable our web pages to be more usable by both real people and the computers that power voice-based user experiences.

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Breaking the Deadlock Between User Experience and Developer Experience

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

A tweet from Nicole Sullivan (@stubornella) reading “More seriously, we need to take a step back and break the deadlock between developer experience and user experience. Why are they at odds with each other? (Perf: file size transferred and memory footprint. Ok, so how do we make that not a thing?”

In early 2013, less than 14% of all web traffic came from mobile devices; today, that number has grown to 53%. In other parts of the world the difference is even more staggering: in African countries, more than 64% of web traffic is from mobile devices; in India, nearly 78% of traffic is mobile. This is a big deal, because all 248 million new internet users in 2017 lived outside the United States.

And while internet connections are getting faster, there are still dozens of countries that access the web at speeds of less than 2 Mbps. Even in developed nations, people on mobile devices see spotty coverage, flaky wifi connections, and coverage interruptions (like train tunnels or country roads).

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User Interface: Hamburg’s Hamburger Menu Problem

, UX Collective - Medium

Suggesting an improvement for Hamburg’s public transportation appLike many metropolitan regions Hamburg, with around 1.8million residents the second biggest city of Germany, its infrastructure service (abbr. HVV) has its own app that is used by thousands of people.

The app is also an integrated component of my everyday life, and the functionalities are even superior than many other apps in the same industry. Despite the mediocre rating in the app store and the flaw in some design aspects, it’s rich in features and provides value to many people. I do like it, and I would like it to become even better. This article showcases one thing that can be improved, and tries to address this bit with established research.

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Designing a happy rating slider.

, UX Collective - Medium

For designing a rating system it’s always good to decide if it’s going to be binary, qualitative or quantitative. Binary means a “yes/no” option. This could be a thumb up and a thumb down, a happy face and a sad face, basically any positive and negative options. A 2-options system. Qualitative is something you can qualify, meaning you can decide what’s good or what’s bad, what works perfect and what could get better. And Quantitative means that you can decide in a specific amount how good it is. From 1 to 10, or 1 to 5. It will depend on the amount of options you want to give the user.

The GoPato App needed a rating range to qualify their orders of 1 to 10. This because of the Net Promoter Score® or NPS®, which is the system we are using to measure the experience of the customers and to predict the business growth. It measures it in a simple way according to the rating the customers do:

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Putting Health Back in the Hands of the People; Designing Health for the Mobile Experience

, UX Collective - Medium

As this was an open brief to help redesign any mobile application currently in the market, we felt that it would be much more meaningful to choose an app that would benefit the public.

We threw out many ideas about apps that we could redesign; from transport to second-hand goods market, food delivery as well as health. Even though this was a school project, we felt it was only appropriate to work on something meaningful; that would speak to the masses.

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The Role of Observation in User Research

, UXmatters

By Jim Ross

User research consists of two core activities: observing and interviewing. Since we’re most interested in people’s behavior, observing is the most important of these activities because it provides the most accurate information about people, their tasks, and their needs.

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Signon, Signoff, and Registration

, UXmatters

By Steven Hoober

The first experience people have with your mobile app is the most critical. If they cannot get it working right away, they won’t finish setting it up and won’t come back.

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UX Research: Using Sketches in Asking Questions

, UXmatters

By Michael Morgan

Young children communicate well visually. When they want to articulate something for which they simply don’t have words, they point to objects in their environment. When they want more food and their plate is empty, they point to their empty plate or slam their plate down onto the table to signal hunger. They are prompting their parents to visualize what they are asking for. Their parents see the empty plate and know they’ve just finished eating their food. Their child must be asking for more food.

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